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Table of Contents
CASE REPORT
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 205-206

Transformation to virtual training during COVID-19 pandemic: Case report from a low resources' country


1 Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Al Minufya, Egypt
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Al Minufya, Egypt

Date of Submission10-Jun-2020
Date of Decision18-Jun-2020
Date of Acceptance30-Jun-2020
Date of Web Publication10-Dec-2020

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Gehan S Sadek
Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Al Minufya
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JMAU.JMAU_48_20

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  Abstract 


Many challenges had faced medical schools worldwide after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. From these challenges, training of the next generation of physicians and academic staff. Adoption of online education and training with getting the benefit of technology had introduced. Egypt has another special challenge, which is the adoption of a new undergraduate competency-based program since September 2018. Hence, there is a necessity to complete the ongoing capacity building of the academic staff regarding the development of all domains of medical education. Here is a case report of interactive training assessment online courses, which proved promising. Although there is fear about the rapid, unexpected transformation, in fact, it may lead to the emergence of a new model for teaching and learning, which is a mixture between the regular and electronic methods.

Keywords: Assessment, COVID-19, virtual training


How to cite this article:
Sadek GS, Kora MA. Transformation to virtual training during COVID-19 pandemic: Case report from a low resources' country. J Microsc Ultrastruct 2020;8:205-6

How to cite this URL:
Sadek GS, Kora MA. Transformation to virtual training during COVID-19 pandemic: Case report from a low resources' country. J Microsc Ultrastruct [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jan 20];8:205-6. Available from: https://www.jmau.org/text.asp?2020/8/4/205/302965




  Introduction Top


COVID-19 pandemic disrupted education in a surpassing way.[1] Physical attendance at workshops, conferences, and training courses has ceased in all countries, including Egypt.[2] There were many challenges facing medical schools, especially those concerned with the training of physicians and academic staff.[3] Medical schools had to rapidly adapt to that situation, so the adoption of online education and training with getting the benefit of technology had introduced. Video conferencing platforms such as Zoom and Webex had been used on a large scale.[4],[5] However, Egypt has another special challenge, which is the adoption of a new undergraduate competency-based program since September 2018. This work aimed at the documentation of the rapid adaptation of medical schools in Egypt during the COVID-19 pandemic.


  Case Report Top


This is a case report from Egypt, which is one of the low resources' countries and how medical schools rapidly adapted to the current situation by proceeding in the capacity building process of academic staff to prepare for the new competency-based program. Measurement and Assessment Unit in Menoufia Faculty of Medicine, Egypt announced from the beginning of the pandemic that all the training courses offered for academic staff will be virtual. The first virtual course implemented was named “Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and Objective Structured Long Examination Record.”

It was performed in 2 days through the Zoom platform using the free 40 min sessions. Twenty-nine professors attended the course from general surgery, tropical, internal medicine, chest diseases, family medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, ophthalmology, and otorhinolaryngology Departments.

Every training day was divided into seven Zoom sessions. The training methods used were brainstorming, Think–Pair-Share (TPS), workshops, discussions, and case study. The facilities provided by Zoom were used such as breakout rooms, whiteboard, video, share screen, raise hands, and chats. Furthermore, an assignment was demanded from every group of trainees (They were classified into 5 trainees' groups). This assignment was the formation of a complete OSCE station profile. Workshops and TPS were done through the breakout rooms in Zoom with saving the activities done by every group of trainees on the whiteboard of Zoom. The trainer held two Zoom meetings before the course to train the trainees about its use as all of them had not used it before. This was the first virtual interactive course done in Menoufia Faculty of Medicine, Egypt.

Concerning the trainees, they were satisfied with this initiative. Sixty percent stated that the Zoom was very useful as a training platform and 28% say that it was excellent. Forty-eight percent reported that the breakout rooms were very suitable for implementing the workshops and TBS and 28% stated that they were excellent. Eighty-eight percent saw that the facilities offered by Zoom during training, such as videos, raising hands, chats, and others, were excellent. Fifty-two percent saw that the use of the whiteboard of the platform was easy and useful when displaying their work. However, 56% of trainees stated that the sound was very good and only 4% stated that it was excellent. Few trainees had some problems with the Internet.

Seventy-two percent saw that the scientific content of the course was excellent. Fifty-six percent stated that the training methods used were suitable for the learning objectives of the course. One hundred percent stated that the material was presented in a clear logical sequence and that the trainer involved the audience and responded to trainees' questions positively.

Regarding the administration, there was a high degree of satisfaction with the feedback of trainees.


  Discussion Top


COVID-19 caused a transformation in the educational process with a rapid transition to virtual platforms. It was stated that this led to the disruption of some curricula, especially with professors who were less prepared and trained in the use of technology through the Internet and in the management of the classroom with a screen and microphone. There were some professors who panicked from this situation to the extent that they had canceled some lectures.[6] Despite these challenges and although some think that the sudden, unexpected and unpredictable start of e-learning in the pandemic will lead to severe consequences for education, in fact, it may lead to the emergence of a new model for teaching and learning which is a mixture between the regular and electronic methods. This will have a wonderful and profound impact on the education process and will be a vital essential part of it.[7] Hence, it is very important now for all who are involved in medical education, including the decision-makers, to begin preparation for the future situation after the end of the pandemic.[2]

It is also important to consider the challenges that must be addressed. Preparation and training of both trainers and trainees about the usage of technology are mandatory to ensure the success of the upcoming period.[2] Furthermore, you must ensure the choice of the suitable platform and the proficiency and competency of the instructors as the presence of a good foundation and strong understanding of educational pedagogy is always the guarantee of good teaching quality.[8]


  Conclusion Top


Transformation to virtual training instead of onsite training was so beneficial regarding assessment courses delivered from Measurement and Assessment Unit, Menoufia Faculty of Medicine during the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite a fear of inability to perform interactive training methods during the courses, many training methods were done with very good satisfaction of all stakeholders. Although this type of courses was delivered in response to the pandemic; however, it will be considered after it. It will be suitable for the academic staff, especially clinicians having restricted time on campus.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Murphy MP. COVID-19 and emergency eLearning: Consequences of the securitization of higher education for post-pandemic pedagogy. Contemp Security Policy 2020:492-505. [doi: 10.1080/13523260.2020.1761749].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Goh P, Sandars J. A vision of the use of technology in medical education after the COVID-19 pandemic. MedEdPublish 2020;9:49.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Murphy B. COVID-19: How the Virus is Impacting Medical Schools; 2020. Available from: https://www.ama-assn.org/delivering-care/public-health/covid-19-how-virus-impacting-medical-schools. [Last accessed on 2020 Mar 30].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Cleland J, McKimm J, Fuller R, Taylor D, Janczukowicz J, Trevor Gibbs T. Adapting to the impact of COVID-19: Sharing stories, sharing practice. Med Teach 2020:1-4. [doi.org/10.1080/0142159X.2020.1757635].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Online Learning Gets its Moment Due to COVID-19 Pandemic: Here's How Education Will Change. Available from: https://www.zdnet.com/article/online-learning-gets-its-moment-due-to-covid-19-pandemic-heres-how-education-will-change/.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Iwai Y. Online Learning during the COVID-19 Pandemic: What do we gain and what do we lose when classrooms go virtual? Sci Am 2020. Available from: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/online-learning-during-the-covid-19-pandemic/. [Last accessed on 2020 Apr 01].  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
The COVID-19 Pandemic has Changed Education Forever. This is How. Available from: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/04/coronavirus-education-global-covid19-online-digital-learning/.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Goh PS. eLearning or technology enhanced learning in medical education–Hope, not hype. Med Teach 2016;38:957-8. [Last accessed on 2020 Jul 19].  Back to cited text no. 8
    




 

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Case Report
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